Ice-buster 

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Phone:1-631-580-0437

Description of the Preferred Embodiment

The following discussion describes in detail one embodiment of the invention (and several variations of that embodiment). This discussion should not be construed, however, as limiting the invention to those particular embodiments. Practitioners skilled in the art will recognize numerous other embodiments as well. For definition of the complete scope of the invention, the reader is directed to appended claims.

Referring to Figure 1, shown is a side view of a vehicle 12 after snowfall 14 without the ice and snow elimination system of the present invention 10. Referring to Figure 2, shown is a side view of a vehicle 12 including the ice and snow elimination system of the present invention 10 including a precipitation sensor 18 activation lights 20a, 20b on the dashboard, gas tubing 16 around the front windshield 15, gas tubing 22 around the roof 21, gas tubing 24 around rear windshield 25 and gas tubes 27 hidden underneath the driver side window molding 23.

Referring to Figure 3, shown is a perspective view of a remote communication unit 26 for use with the ice and snow elimination system of the present invention showing the lock button 30, the unlock button 28, the ice buster button 31, the snowflake remote button 34 and the ignition start button 32.

Referring to Figure 4, shown is a front view of a vehicle including the ice and snow elimination system of the present invention showing the gas tubing 16 around the front windshield 15, the precipitation sensor 18 and the activation lights 20a, 20b.

Referring to Figure 5, shown is a top view of a vehicle including the ice and snow elimination system of the present invention installed showing the precipitation sensors 18,

gas tube 19 for the hood, white activation light 20a and green activation light 20b, gas tubing 16 around front windshield 15, gas tubing 22 around the roof 21 and the gas tubing 24 around the rear windshield 25.

Referring to Figure 6, shown is an enlarged view of a vehicle windshield including the ice and snow elimination system of the present invention taken from Figure 5 as indicated. Shown is a precipitation sensor 18, the white and green activation lights 20a, 20b and the gas tubing 16 around the front windshield.

Referring to Figure 7, shown is a block diagram of the ice and snow elimination system of the present invention. Shown is the processor 40 in communication with the voltage regulator 46, the ice buster remote button 36, the temperature sensor 42, the precipitation sensor 18, the gas tubes 16, 19 22,24,27, the 72 hour shutoff clock 44, the green and white activation lights 20a, 20b, the battery 38 and the snowflake remote button 34.

Referring to Figure 8, shown is a block diagram of the standard sentry mode of the present invention. As shown in step S 100, the engine is turned off. The driver presses the snowflake icon on the car remote in step S105. Thereafter, when the temperature sensor indicates that the outside temperature is below 33° F as stated in step S120, the system enters standard sentry mode in step S250. A white activation light goes on in step S275 and a 72-hour countdown clock starts the operative duration of standard sentry mode, as shown in step S280. Expiration of the 72-hour clock in step S415 deactivates standard sentry mode in step S420. Additionally, starting the engine in step S410 automatically deactivates standard sentry mode in step S420.

In step S300 when the precipitation sensor detects snow falling, gas tubes emit infrared rays with a gradual temperature increase in step S350 that continuously turn on and off to save energy in step S355 with the temperature of the infrared heat varying with outside temperature in step S375. Accordingly, heat from the infrared rays melts the snow, preventing it from accumulating on exterior vehicle surfaces in step 5385. In step S500, the precipitation sensor indicates the stop of snowfall for a set interval. As a consequence, the system enters evaporation mode in step S600. Whereupon, heat from infrared rays evaporates all water from glass and metal surfaces in step S650. Evaporation mode shuts off after all water is evaporated in step S670, with the system reverting to standard sentry mode in step S675. As aforementioned in step S105, the driver presses the snowflake icon on the car remote energizing the temperature sensor, which if the temperature sensor indicates that outside temperature is above 32° F in step S400, standard sentry mode enters standby mode in step S440 until in step S450 when the temperature sensor indicates that outside temperature goes below 33° F, thereafter standard sentry mode is reactivated in step 5700.

Referring to Figure 9, shown is a block diagram of the automatic sentry mode of the present invention. In step S100, the engine is turned off initiating engagement of the temperature sensor, which when the temperature sensor indicates that the outside temperature is below 33° F in step S 120, the system enters automatic sentry mode in step S260.

In step S300 when the precipitation sensor detects snow falling, gas tubes emit infrared rays with a gradual temperature increase in step S350 with the temperature of the infrared heat varying with outside temperature in step 5375. Accordingly, heat from the infrared rays melts snow, preventing it from accumulating on exterior vehicle surfaces in step 5385. When the temperature sensor indicates that outside temperature is above 32° F in step S400, automatic sentry mode enters standby mode in step 5445 until in step S450 when the temperature sensor indicates that outside temperature goes below 33° F, whereupon, automatic sentry mode is reactivated in step S570.

In step S500, the precipitation sensor indicates the stop of snowfall for a set interval. The system enters evaporation mode in step S600 with heat from infrared rays that evaporate all water from glass and metal surfaces in step 5650. Evaporation mode shuts off after all water is evaporated in step S670, with the system reverting to automatic sentry mode in step S710.

 

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